Politicians have allowed judges to usurp too much power

Canadians have never been that interested in who sits on our top court. We should be

Politicians have allowed judges to usurp too much powerLeaks from the prime minister’s office concerning the potential appointment of Justice Glenn Joyal, Chief Justice of the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench, to the Supreme Court of Canada highlights differences between the treatment of judiciary appointments in Canada and the United States. Why do Canadians not pay more attention to appointments to our highest…

Why Western civilization is abandoning progress for populism

The shocking rise of identity politics has shattered social unity, which seems to be unraveling like a cheap carpet. And that led to self-centred white identity

Why Western civilization is abandoning progress for populismJesus said it first but Abraham Lincoln said it best: “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” We live in divisive times, with multiple challenges. But the greatest threat to our civilization is not climate change (as damaging as that may be), nor is it growing inequality or reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. The astonishing divide…

Federal government challenges the independence of Canadian media

The proposal to give $595 million in federal funding over five years to Canadian media organizations comes with significant strings attached

Federal government challenges the independence of Canadian mediaMuch has been written about the federal government’s proposal to give $595 million in funding over five years to Canadian media organizations. This political strategy has been called everything from a financial life saver to a Liberal takeover/buyout of our news industry. While it’s hard to blame anyone in the media who is starving economically…

Blurring the lines in the protein battle for consumers

With the help of the new food guide, Canadians are looking differently at protein sources. That doesn't mean beef is doomed, but it will have to adapt

Blurring the lines in the protein battle for consumersPlant-based nutrition is alive and well in Canada, according to a recent poll. The poll from Angus Reid Global, in partnership with Dalhousie University, found that by April 2019, 38 per cent of Canadians had tried a plant-based protein food item in recent months. British Columbia had the highest rate, at 44 per cent, followed…

Disruptive platforms create fair market conditions

Peer-to-peer platforms such as Airbnb bring more resources to the market, increasing supply and lowering prices

Disruptive platforms create fair market conditionsUber drivers in Buenos Aires ask passengers to ride up front to avoid vigilante attacks, since an Argentine judge has ruled Uber illegal and the country’s banks have cut off Uber’s access. The city’s taxi cartel has shut down roads and brought violence and arson upon Uber drivers and vehicles. Yet Uber’s popularity has exploded…

Socialism at root of the green movement

Recent global developments cast doubt on the motives and methods of the most ardent proponents of global warming

Socialism at root of the green movementThe headlong rush in Canada to punitive carbon taxes, and restrictions on production, transport and consumption of coal, oil and natural gas, may take a much-needed pause. That’s due to the SNC-Lavalin affair dragging down the federal government, the resignation of a key leader of the World Bank, and a new head of the presidential…

Reasoned skepticism about climate change is healthy

Let’s not deal with the grim science of cynical political marketing and hyperbole. Instead, we should rigorously adjudicate all belief

Reasoned skepticism about climate change is healthySpotting headlines about the recent United Nations report prophesying imminent global extinction of a million species, I immediately wondered at the media response should Donald Trump ever claim to have eaten a million ice-cream cones. Instinct tells me swarms of media fact-checkers would have been at every Baskin-Robbins or Ben & Jerry’s in the United…

Pipeline shortage cost Canada’s energy sector $20.6 billion in 2018

That means less investment, less job creation and ultimately less prosperity for Canadians

Pipeline shortage cost Canada’s energy sector $20.6 billion in 2018By Elmira Aliakbari and Ashley Stedman The Fraser Institute With pipeline shortages driving down the price of Canadian oil, the losses for the energy sector – and for Canada’s economy – are staggering. According to a new study, insufficient pipeline capacity cost Canada’s energy sector $20.6 billion – or one per cent of the country’s…

Mid-career workers are higher education’s next challenge

The traditional student no longer exists. That means we need to find ways to encourage and fund lifelong learning

Mid-career workers are higher education’s next challengeWith a host of transformational challenges putting pressure on labour markets, a line from Robert Atkinson and Jeffrey Brown’s latest paper struck me: “Nothing about the future of work is inevitable.” Their paper is intended to reaffirm that in the face of structural change, coming impacts can be mitigated through dedicated effort and smart policy.…

Cellphone industry continues to control the safety message

In the U.S., the industry has influenced science, regulators, public perception and government policy

Cellphone industry continues to control the safety messageWhen industry wants science to say something, how does it do it? Last year, The Nation showed us how in its special investigation, How Big Wireless Made Us Think That Cell Phones Are Safe. In 1993, a lawsuit alleged that cellphones caused a woman’s terminal brain cancer. As wireless stocks headed downward, the industry unleashed…
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