Municipalities must protect against cyber attacks

Canadian towns and cities hold valuable data yet are poorly prepared to detect and fend off attacks

Municipalities must protect against cyber attacksCybercriminals have caught Canadian municipalities flat-footed. Our cities must get with the times or send more taxpayer money and private data out the door. Cybercrime costs Canada $3.12 billion a year. A portion of that involves ransom payments to cybercriminals who digitally hold computers hostage. Ransomware, which involves remotely encrypting hard drives and demanding money…

Food inspectors getting tough on olive oil fraud

Food fraud affects many food categories, but stakes are a little higher with olive oil due to potential allergens in substitute ingredients

Food inspectors getting tough on olive oil fraudOlive production in Italy was hard hit last year due to an early frost. The country’s production dropped by 57 per cent. Greece and Portugal suffered similar fates, along with pest issues, and saw their production drop by 35 and 15 per cent, respectively. Short food supplies generate economically-motivated adulteration, that is, adding a inferior…

Protect yourself against the rising tide of tech-based scams

Just like we change the batteries in our smoke detectors annually, so should we change all our passwords

Protect yourself against the rising tide of tech-based scams“There’s a sucker born every minute,” 19th-century showman P.T. Barnum reportedly said. In fact, the notion predates Barnum – and is just as applicable in the modern era. Con artists take advantage of our default desire to trust. They know how to manipulate people into doing something that under normal circumstances they should be wary…

Cleaning up Vancouver’s “rat’s nest of rot”

Single-family houses in the city are now deposit boxes. How did we get here and how can we restore balance?

Cleaning up Vancouver’s “rat’s nest of rot”It’s time for broad review of the dirty money games played in the casinos and on the high streets of the raincoast’s ‘capital' city. B.C. Attorney General David Eby recently reported that upwards of $2 billion in dirty money laundering has occurred in Vancouver casinos and luxury real estate over the past year. He characterized…

Four things Canada’s top spy didn’t say

David Vigneault’s recent speech was a slick deflection and thinly-veiled push for broader surveillance

Four things Canada’s top spy didn’t sayWhen David Vigneault addressed the Economic Club, the nation's intelligence chief acknowledged his agency's first rule: “Don't talk.” True to form, he said little in his tightly-scripted remarks on Dec. 4. What the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) director left out, though, amounted to glaring omissions. His remarks were misleading at best, dishonest at worst.…

Senior citizens become drug mules as the result of a growing scam

Who is a customs agent more likely to search: a 70-year-old granny carrying a bag of sweets or a scruffy 25-year-old guy?

Senior citizens become drug mules as the result of a growing scamThere are three main methods con men use to trick their mark. They try to gain their sympathy, take advantage of greed, or threaten or extort. If you’re in the wrong frame of mind, your critical thinking skills might shut down. You see and hear what the con man wants you to. But if a…

One sentencing standard for all offenders

Terri-Lynne McClintic shouldn't have been sent to a healing lodge. In fact, the very nature of such institutions defies fair practise

One sentencing standard for all offendersTerri-Lynne McClintic, convicted of the 2009 abduction, rape and murder of eight-year-old Tory Stanford, was recently moved from federal prison to a healing lodge. Canadians were surprised – to say the least – that the transfer of a convicted child murderer to a healing lodge was not something new but had being going on since…

We can’t ignore the roots of some rural crime

Trotting out historical excuses for criminal actions will only leave rural residents to continue to be terrorized by gangsters

We can’t ignore the roots of some rural crimeRural crime near troubled reserves on the Prairies must be acknowledged if there’s any hope of remedying the situation. Doug Cuthand, an Indigenous Saskatchewan columnist, believes the phrase ‘rural crime‘ is code for crimes committed by Indigenous thugs. But in Saskatchewan, for example, an Indigenous man is 33 times as likely to be convicted of…

Why Canada needs more restorative justice

‘Imagine what society would look like with more empowered, restored individuals, giving back like I am, changing like I did’

Why Canada needs more restorative justiceBy Sen. Art Eggleton and Sen. Raymonde Saint-Germain A Department of Justice survey conducted earlier this year discovered that over half of Canadians (52 per cent) have little familiarity with restorative justice despite its use in our criminal justice system for over 40 years. So what is restorative justice? And can it provide better justice…

Let’s not ‘whitewash’ Cindy Gladue’s death

We must come to terms with the systemic racism and sexism the Canadian justice imposes on Indigenous people

Let’s not ‘whitewash’ Cindy Gladue’s deathThe Supreme Court of Canada recently heard the most important case in a generation regarding the Canadian legal system’s response to murdered and missing Indigenous women. The hearing was the culmination of a case that was set in motion on the morning of June 22, 2011. On that day, Bradley Barton checked out of a…